World Origami Days 2021 Schedule

Introduction to WOD/Crown
October 24, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Simple
Presenter: Wendy Zeichner
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Laura Kruskal

King David’s Crown: 4 sheets of 8.5x11” or 4 sheets of A4;
Canoe Based Crown: 9 to 11 sheets of 8.5x11” or A4. (depending on head size);
Optional: Glue stick

To kick off World Origami Days we are celebrating the birthday of a woman who played a huge role in bringing origami to the West. About this woman, Martin Gardner wrote: “Thousands of people, of all ages and walks of life, have discovered the pleasures of this fascinating, gentle art. Why has it so strongly caught the fancy of the American people? The causes are no doubt varied and complex, but if I were asked to name the single, most effective cause, I would answer unhesitatingly: Lillian Oppenheimer.”
October 24 is the birthday of Lillian Oppenheimer (1898-1992), who founded the first origami group in America. She was also one of the founders of the British Origami Society and OrigamiUSA. A dynamic woman, she was delighted in the magic to be found in a piece of paper and wanted to share it with the world. She famously held folding events in her apartment in NYC, and there are still those among us who attended those events. Happy Birthday, Lillian!
In honor of Lillian’s birthday, Wendy Zeichner (current President of OrigamiUSA) will teach the King David’s crown designed by Laura Kruskal and named after Lillian’s grandson. Laura Kruskal, Lillian’s daughter-in-law, was also an active participant in establishing the origami community in the United States beginning in the late 1950s. Laura was well known for her wonderful origami crowns taught every year at our Annual Convention. Wendy will also teach Laura’s favorite crown, the Canoe Base Module Crown.

Display Stand
October 24, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Low Intermediate
Presenter: Wendy Zeichner
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Laura Kruskal

For each plinth you will need:
1 sheet of 8.5 x 11” and 1 sheet 4.5” square;
Ruler;
OR pre-printed templates (These can be printed on letter or A4 paper)

Description: Folders love to share what they are folding during World Origami Days. With that purpose in mind, Wendy will teach a plinth with the World Origami Days 2021 logo on it so you can display what you are learning and share on social media.

Wendy is honored to teach this wonderful display created by one of the PCOC (Pacific Coast OrigamiUSA Convention) founders, V'Ann Cornelius. V'Ann was a tireless contributor to the world of origami and the driving force behind the PCOC conventions. Most notably, V'Ann is responsible for bringing origami into acceptance in the mainstream art world. Not only through the groundbreaking "Origami Masterworks" exhibition at the Mingei Museum in San Diego and various other exhibitions, but also through her devotion every year with the exhibition at the OrigamiUSA annual convention, and her unswerving attention to the quality of the exhibition and presentation.

We have templates for you to download and print out prior to the class. You need to download and print a top and either a landscape or portrait version of the plinth. The top will need to be cut prior to class.

Virus
October 25, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Unrated
Presenter: Xander Perrot
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Xander Perrot

15 squares of paper, which will each be cut into two 1:√3 rectangles;
Scissors/cutting tool;
OR 30 rectangles in proportion 1:√3 if you wish to prepare in advance.
Paper with a different colour on each side is recommended because both sides of the paper will show.

Modular, or unit, origami uses two or more sheets of paper to create a larger and more complex structure than would be possible using single-piece origami techniques. Each sheet of paper is folded into a module or unit, and then modules are assembled into an integrated flat shape or three-dimensional structure. These structures often have very clever folded interlocking systems of tabs and pockets.

In this class, you will learn to fold a 30 unit modular origami model with a structure that is reminiscent of a virus (what more appropriate for these pandemic times?) The model is folded from 30 rectangles of paper in 1:√3 proportion and does not require any adhesive for assembly. It has a very robust locking mechanism created by the folding sequence so once complete you can even hand it to someone else to look at without fear that it will fall apart!

In the class we will show how to fold the units and put some together as well as guidance on the full assembly, but there will not be time to fold all 30 units so you will need to complete the model in your own time after class. Note: It is not possible to create a smaller assembly than 30 pieces with this unit.

Crystal Brooch
October 26, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Unrated
Presenter: Mariko Miyamoto
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Mariko Miyamoto

15x 15 ㎝ &9 x 9 ㎝ Kami paper(6” & 3.5”);
Brooch pin back

Origami Jewelry, a new category for World Origami Days this year, combines two different artforms; origami and jewelry. Origami jewelry requires precise folding of smaller paper and combining the finished product with jewelry techniques to make wearable art.

Mariko is not only an origami creator but a master of turning her original origami creations into lovely pieces of jewelry. You can create a brooch with one unit or combine 2 units for a different look.

Cathedral Origami Quilt
October 27, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Intermediate
Presenter: Jannie van Schulenberg
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Jannie van Schulenberg

4 sheets of plain origami paper 15 x 15 cm (6” x 6”) (Cut according to pdf) ;
4 sheets of patterned origami paper 15 x 15 cm (6”x6”) (Cut according to pdf);
1 skewer (for hanging);
2 beads (for end of skewer);
wire 20-25 cm (~8 to 10”) (for hanging);

“Unit origami is a combination of parts, so it is natural that it leads up to the patchwork quilt. You can use scraps of paper to make a quilt. The combination of units is interesting itself, but the color and pattern of paper play an important role in the result. This is one of the fascinating points of ‘origami quilt’ like that of cloth quilt. The practical use of paper quilts in our daily life is limited, but it is delightful to make it, since it has an element of puzzle and it displays unique patterns that only origami can produce.” ~Tomoko Fuse.

Jannie will teach us her Cathedral Origami Quilt, which is like the cloth counterpart. With the right paper it could look like stained glass.

Bat/Bakeneko Cat Spirit
October 28, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Low Intermediate
Presenter: Adriano Mariano
Host(s):
Creator(s):
Adriano Mariano

Bat: 2 sheets of paper 15 x 15 cm (6”) bicolor (black and white is perfect);
Cat: 15 x 15 cm (6”)Tant (or kami will work-no color changes)

Description: Holiday origami is a favorite category for many folders. Origami is used for ornaments, party decorations and favors. Many creators have fun with holiday designs.

Adriano will share the spirit of the fall season with 2 origami bats, one that is more whimsical and one that is more realistic.

Jack o’Lantern Tessellation
October 29, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Complex
Presenter: Melina Hermsen
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Melina Hermsen

Pre-Creased triangular grid 1:32 parallel to the longer side of the paper;
Use the diagram for my Butterfly (in supplemental materials), in the first steps (1-19) a 1:16 grid is folded. Repeat steps 16-18 one more time for a 1:32 grid.
Paper: Elephant Hide or similar; strong and stiff.
Size: around DinA4 or A4/US Letter paper (or bigger (rectangle, just a bit longer than a square);
Clips

How are new forms of paper folding developed? We have been introduced to quite a few different types of origami, from some of the most traditional (like representational), to new innovations (like tessellations), and there will be more types to come before World Origami Days are over! A somewhat different take on creating a new approach is to combine various forms.

Melina combines tessellations with representational origami. Continuing with our holiday theme, you will be using a triangular grid to fold one molecule of her pumpkin tessellation (as shown in the picture).

Halloween blocks(Jack-o'-Lantern,skull,ghost); Magic hat; Santa Bookmark
October 30, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Low Intermediate
Presenter: Tatsumi ( (Shigeru Mitsuda)
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Tatsumi ( (Shigeru Mitsuda)

Halloween Blocks: 15 x 15 cm (6”) paper for each block, regular kami or duo kami. Please prepare three sheets of paper with an 8 x 8 grid, mountain folds, on dominant color side.
Magic Hat: 15 cm (6”) kami (black);
Santa Bookmark: 15 cm (6”) kami paper (duo red/white)

Kawaii! Is cute a category in origami? These 2 models would definitely fit that category. Tatsumi will teach cute and clever halloween blocks and a santa bookmark.

Panda
October 31, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Complex
Presenter: Michelle Fung
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Michelle Fung

One uncut square of regular origami paper. Minimum recommended size: 24 x 24 cm (9.4”).

Complex origami usually refers to models that require a large number of steps to complete --- sometimes even hundreds of steps. These models are often passed from the designer to other folders by in-person teaching or through crease patterns (designs that show the folds needed for the model), but not the step-by-step diagrams that are seen for less complex models. Michelle Fung will walk us through a complex model --- come with your patience!

This cute panda model looks simple, but is actually complex. Class participants should be comfortable with folding precisely, spread-squash/spread sink folds, swivel folds, and turning parts of the model inside out. All of these techniques are used to achieve the desired color changes.

Maple Leaf/Sea Lion
November 1, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Intermediate
Presenter: Michael LaFosse
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Michael LaFosse

Maple Leaf: Solid-color paper 10 to 15 cm square (4 to 6-inches square). Any color you like for an autumn maple leaf. "TANT" is ideal, but you may use any similar paper. Ordinary origami paper is acceptable if you must.

Sea Lion: "TANT" will be ideal, but you may use any similar paper, (not heavier than 110 gsm) and in any color you like. Your paper should measure 20 to 30 cm square (8 to 12-inch).

Tools: Paper towels, Water (a spray bottle or a cup), a Bamboo Skewer, or a thin Knitting Needle. A pair of pointed tweezers will be helpful but not essential.

Wet-folding has many advantages over dry-folding. Besides expressive shaping, wet-folding preserves the integrity of the fibers in your paper (dry-folding breaks and weakens them!). Wet-folding allows you to use many more kinds of papers for origami, including heavy paperboard. Michael LaFosse is known for the expressiveness of his models, which he often achieves through wet-folding.

Michael will teach you the basics of "Full Sheet" wet-folding. We shall warm up by first folding the Maple Leaf, a fine symbol of the autumn season. We shall then fold the Sea Lion and apply what we have learned in our warm-up. The diagrams for this Sea Lion are found in the 2021 PCOC diagram book and in our recent kit, "Origami Endangered Animals" —Tuttle Publishing. It may be helpful for you to practice dry-folding the Sea Lion before our lesson—rehearsal before wet-folding any project will produce better results!

Rose Box
November 2, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
High Intermediate
Presenter: Roman Diaz
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Roman Diaz

Top: 24 x 24 cm (9.4”) duo colored paper;
Bottom: 15 x 15 cm (6”) paper (only one side will show).

Boxes, bowls, vases! Making origami containers is a popular activity. One of the earliest box designs is the masu box, which is simple and elegant. Traditionally it was used as a way to measure out a standard portion of rice. The masu box and many bowls and vases are made with one sheet of paper, but there are also some wonderful modular boxes in interesting shapes --- square, hexagonal, octagonal….and many more.

With this box, Roman combines an elegant box with a lovely rose!
Crisp and precise folding required. It helps to be familiar with the Kawasaki or some other twist rose. (The class will not be paced for beginners.)

Mondrian Cube
November 3, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Unrated
Presenter: Char Morrow
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
David Mitchell

12 sheets of 15 x 15 cm (6”) kami recommended, 4 colors (3 sheets of each);
Classic Mondrian: yellow, red, black and white.

Unit origami lends itself to using clever tabs and pockets to change the look of a common object like a cube. For inspiration the units for this cube were designed to reflect the classic Mondrian colors and proportional shapes. Of course you can choose any colors you like!

Char will teach this classic model created by David Mitchell.

Square Knots Weave
November 4, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
High Intermediate
Presenter: Madonna Yoder
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Madonna Yoder

Three smaller squares 15 x 15 cm (6”), folded into 8 x 8 square grids;
One larger square 20 to 35 cm (8-14“), folded into a 32 x 32 square grid;
A strong paper like Tant or Skytone is recommended, although kami will also work.

In recent years there has been a great buzz around tessellations! This is a way of making a pattern where one or more shapes are placed together leaving no spaces between them, and then repeated over and over --- think of a bathroom floor or wall. Origami tessellations have folded shapes that are repeated over and over using just one piece of paper, or sometimes fabric.

We will practice open, closed, and hybrid square twists, then use them to make the Square Knots Weave tessellation.

Darth Vader Puppet
November 5, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
Intermediate
Presenter: Riccardo Foschi
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Riccardo Foschi

3 square sheets of kami paper or printer paper 20 to 25 cm (8 to 10”) black on both side

Origami toys are fun! During this class we'll learn to fold Darth Vader's finger doll. It's an easy intermediate modular model that requires no glue and no cuts to shape and assemble.

(The Storm Troopers will not be taught in this class.)

Turtle
November 6, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EDT
Level:
High Intermediate
Presenter: Beth Johnson
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Beth Johnson

One sheet of hexagon shaped paper. There is no color change so a single color will do. A good size is a hexagon 20 to 23 cm (8 to 9”) measured edge to edge. Smaller works well too. You can consult this video to make a hexagon from a square or rectangle https://www.happyfolding.com/instructions-hexagon

Beth Johnson is known for her innovative and beautiful models. They incorporate many different techniques of origami to create unique models.

This plump and sassy turtle is folded from a hexagon. Please come with a hexagon already precut (there are many tutorials online for this). We will start by folding a grid of 16ths, which is a nice and relatively painless grid division with which to start. Then we will build upon the grid to collapse the model.

9-Gold Star Bracelet
November 7, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EST
Level:
High Intermediate
Presenter: Linda Mihara
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Linda Mihara

1 sheet of metallic washi or Yuzen, cut to 3” x 30”.

Linda will show us another piece of elegant jewelry, her 9-Star Bracelet. This model has a slight stretch, so it can easily be wearable.

$ Encyclopedia Origamica
November 8, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EST
Level:
Intermediate
Presenter: Glenn Sapaden
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Glenn Sapaden

15 total American dollar bills (12 for the books, 3 for the bookshelf).
In order to learn, the folding and assembly have at least 5 bills (3 for the bookshelf, 2 for books). We will fold as many volumes as time and patience permit.

Description:
Paper currency is readily available paper for folding --- just look in your wallet! There are many clever models made from dollar bills, sometimes incorporating objects pictured on the bill as part of the design. You can transform your dollar bills into clothing, hearts, flowers, and much more. Dollar bill origami enthusiasts like to give folded bills to servers as a tip.

This dollar model features twelve numbered book volumes enclosed in a modular bookcase. The volume numbers come from the numbers on the bills designating their federal reserve district.

This is an intermediate model, requiring precise folding and careful assembly.

Links to crease patterns:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/glennfolds5/51301085076/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/glennfolds5/51302097570/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/glennfolds5/51302097155/in/dateposted-public/

Beaver
November 9, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EST
Level:
Complex
Presenter: Richard Ellison
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Richard Ellison

Required: 1 square of thick paper, 8”-10” on a side, 90-120 gsm;
Small bowl of plain water;
Paper towels;
6 mini clothespins (or binder clips, or other such miniature clamp);
Sticky tape (masking or painter’s recommended).

Optional, but recommended: Hair dryer, atomizer spray bottle, tool with a small, rounded tip (e.g. embossing tool, knitting needle or retracted mechanical pencil), bone folder.

Further notes on paper: A 6” square will work for those who like to fold in miniature. Tant paper, at 78 gsm, is a bit thin for wet folding, but can work at smaller sizes (6”-8”). I have successfully folded this from a 10” square cut from a paper grocery sack, which is a type of thick kraft paper. Foil paper will work in lieu of wet folding, but the spread squashes will be difficult to perform neatly.

In this class Richard will use wetfolding to enhance his complex model to make it more full of life.

Richard notes that the beaver, who chews down trees for the construction of dams and lodges, is a symbol of industriousness. In this session we will fold his likeness. His stout, flexible body makes him a good candidate for a particular type of animal design, featuring a closed back and soft, wet-folded lines. This design involves a short sequence of spread squashes and closed sinks, putting it at the complex folding level. By speeding the drying process with a hair dryer, we should be able to get to a final product within the two hours allotted.

Mouse
November 10, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EST
Level:
Complex
Presenter: Robert J. Lang
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Robert J. Lang

This mouse folds nicely from 25 x 25 cm (10”) foil-backed paper. The one in the photo is folded from 25 cm Alufoil (folded white-side out, which is how the model will be taught).

Representational origami is one of the most well-known, and perhaps one of the earliest, types of origami. The first representational origami sculptures were probably butterflies attached to sake bottles at Shinto weddings in Japan. One of the best known representational models is the crane.
Robert Lang's representational designs are well-known for their great detail, realism, and complexity.
This is a complex 3D mouse that requires 3D shaping for the best effect. Note that it contains several complex sink-folds, some of which require coalescing multiple sinks simultaneously.

Box with Crane
November 11, 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm EST
Level:
Intermediate
Presenter: Ayumi Hayatsu
Host(s):
Kathleen Sheridan
Creator(s):
Tomoko Fuse

Kami paper recommended;
Crane attachment 7.5 cm x 15 cm (3x6”) x 1 sheet;
Lid: 15 x15 cm (6”) x 2 sheets;
Box Body: 15 cm x 15 cm (6”) x 4 sheets;
A cutting tool (scissors or X-Acto knife).

Paper cranes are the most popular form of origami, and have transformed the meaning behind these little works of art. The crane became a symbol of peace in Japan, where you can see strings of cranes placed at temples all over the country as well as at the Peace Park in Hiroshima. On our last day of World Origami Days (and the actual World Origami Day Celebration in Japan), we will fold the crane and a few variations and celebrate the peace of paper worldwide.

The crane attachment called Hanetsuki Tsuru is used in Tomoko Fuse's Crane Origami book for modular models and boxes. It's folded from 1:2 paper with two small cuts. In this class, I will show to complete the box decorated with this crane attachment.