These are articles posted by The Fold editor all (who may or may not be the author; see byline for authorship). The Fold is the online magazine for members of OrigamiUSA. New articles are posted continuously over the two month period of each issue. To contribute to The Fold or for other questions, please see our FAQ.
Diagrams for Ilan Garibi's Pineapple Tessellation that is used in his paper review articles.
Have you ever wondered how printer paper is produced? This article gives a unique insight into how cellulose is transformed into paper at Hadera Paper Mill, Israel.
The fourth installment of a series reviewing types of paper for folding. This article reviews printing paper, probably the most widely available paper out there.
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I compare super-thin insect papers from the grand masters of Origamido Studio and the newcomers from Columbus, Ohio: Paper Circle, and their new "O-gami" brand of handmade paper to fold a demanding spider (CP provided as well).
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Explore hex pleating further with this long- and variable-length-legged spider design.
Peter Engel's newest book picks up where <i>Origami from Angelfish to Zen</i> in his explorations of pattern, form, and meaning within origami.
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The first in a series, analyzing crease patterns. In this article, we take a big picture look at a Werewolf designed by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/53465278@N02/" target="blank">Jacob Rossman</a>.
This article gives some guidelines to follow when recording an instructional video.
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Thomas Hull
The names Maekawa and Kawasaki are known to origamists as great origami creators. But did you know they have Theorems named after them too? And so does the French paper folder Jacques Justin. See what these Theorems are all about. Warning: Math ahead!
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by Julio Eduardo C. T.
Diagrams for a coyote by Julio Eduardo C. T.
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By cmorrow [at] mtholyoke.edu (Charlene Morrow)
An expanded version of a 5OSME convention commentary that appears in the Winter 2011 issue of The Paper, pp 18-19. Many more interesting experiences and color photos that could not be included in The Paper version due to limited space.
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by Andrew Hudson
Making a crease pattern takes less time than drawing a full diagram, but because of the technical difficulty, most folders don't like working with them. Here's some ideas about how to make things easier without spending dozens of hours on a full diagram.
by Joseph Wu
As more and more companies jump on the origami publishing bandwagon, the quality of the books being produced goes down.
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by Tom Defoirdt
Diagrams for a flying angel by Tom Defoirdt
A review of "Outside The Box Origami" By Scott Wasserman Stern
Jiahui Li presents photo diagrams, a video tutorial and design insights behind one of his latest creations, a cockateil.
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by Elsa Chen
A summary and reflections on OrigaMIT's 2011 Student Origami Competition by judge and alumna Elsa Chen, MIT '89.
The third installment of a series reviewing types of paper for folding. This article reviews Japanese Foil paper, which is especially suitable for more advanced folds, such as insects.
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This crease pattern introduces a new form of uniaxial base design, called <i>hex pleating</i> and describes how to use technique technique.
Reviewed by Daniel Scher
Jeremy Shafer's second origami book showcases his wit and creativity with a wide array of action models.

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