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Articles for keyword: tessellation

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by Joanna Sobczyk, diagrams by Adam Szewczyk
Diagrams for a beautiful fractal flower from a hexagon with color change. A very advance design for someone who has only been folding since 2013.
Kate Lukasheva offers a very interesting Q&A on pre-scoring machines.
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by Usman Rosyidhi
Diagrams for the Rose Quilt, by Usman Rosyidhi, from Indonesia.
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Here is Distorta2016 by Alessandro Beber.
For your enjoyment, here are photos from a small exhibition of Tomoko Fuse's art at the Tsunagu Gallery in Tokyo.
Here are some crease patterns for a number of Alessandro Beber's beautiful high intermediate creations.
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An exploration of a propeller tessellation formed from standard square twists.
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by Thomas R. Crain
This article explores several variations in a square twist crease pattern that may be achieved simply by varying the mountain/valley assignment of the same underlying crease pattern.
by Vishwas Deval
Diagrams for an Indian emblem designed by Vishwas Deval.
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The story of a process developed for folding rigid wood laminate, with crease patterns, images, and recipes.
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Two 3D tessellations: a brick wall and an octahedral-tetrahedral truss network.
The Zipper Tessellation is a good starting point for many variations, such as the Zipper Ring and Vase, presented here with crease patterns and some diagrams.
Tessellations have become increasingly popular in origami. But it's not always easy to get started. This article introduces some videos that can help you on the way.
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by Tom Hull
A summary of Bern & Hayes' proof that flat-foldability in origami is computationally hard!
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With many tessellations, the obvious way to design the crease pattern doesn't necessarily result in a foldable pattern. By adding extra creases to the pattern, you can sometimes find an alternate way to the finished form, as you'll see in this geometric pattern.
This article gives a nice overview of the types of tessellations there are, and how to create one yourself.
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by Andrew Hudson
Pureland Origami is used as the starting point for a discussion about realism and convention vs. simplicity and clarity in diagramming style