Issue 64, May–June, 2021

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by Sebastien Limet
One of a series of designs that Sebastien Limet created from surgical masks.
by Shriram Patki
A real bird whose mythological story goes back more than 1500 years.
An essay on the design possibilities of multiple blintzes.
by Patsy Wang-Iverson and Wendy Zeichner
A lovely e-book — free to download — of crowns and memories.
A “Hobbit”-worthy dragon to fold and a discourse on various blintzed bases and their usefulness.
by Linda Marlina Lookman
An orchid with a leaf to create an arrangement.
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by Wendy Zeichner
The late Linda Bogan’s favorite diagrams and recipes in an e-book for OrigamiUSA members.
A card that pops open to reveal a message of love and gratitude.
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by Mahyar Hosien Khani
A seven-unit modular ring with an interesting collapse.
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by Shriram Patki
A sitting dog based on an earlier elephant design by the creator.
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Diagrams for an icosahedral design made with 30 quick-to-fold units from squares. The look is rather festive, and hence the name. You can fold the with thematic colors of the season to fit right in.
by Ushio Ikegami
This is the only diagrammed origami model that simulates a true mathematical fractal. It makes a pyramid shape with many branches. No one has yet successfully folded a version without cutting the paper; the version in the picture (folded by the author) was made by carefully cutting the crease pattern into several pieces, folding these using the recursive folding instructions, and then gluing them back together. The challenge of folding recursive diagrams as well as the dexterity involved to not destroy the paper easily put this model in the supercomplex category.